Category - Art

Cui Jie and the Collision of Sound and Art

From a very early age, Cui Jie was obviously a very gifted artist, and she continues to develop her style now that she is in her mid-30’s. Jie was born in Shanghai, China and eventually ended up studying and honing her craft at the China Academy of Art in the Oil Painting Department. While she now lives in Beijing, China, she is not a total unknown to the Western world, with the Wall Street Journal going as far as to describe her as one of “China’s rising art stars.”guyv7Over the years, the style and subject matter of Jie’s work has changed a little, with her latest work perhaps being the most intriguing. She has spoken about synesthesia, which is essentially when people see a color when they hear a specific sound. She is looking at introducing that idea into her current way of working as opposed to going off on a totally different tangent to explore the connection between sound and visuals. tgbjkh6People unfamiliar with the work that Jie delivers may be interested to hear about how she comes up with her ideas. The art for which she is best known involves looking at sculptures and buildings within the parts of China where she has lived and worked, and then creating a painting of those structures, but from a very different viewpoint than what you would get from looking at them at street level. She often talks about the texture and surfaces of the structures and buildings in question, but rather than taking a hands-on approach, Jie will let the reflections off these surfaces, and the feelings and emotions they invoke, guide her once she decides to put paint to canvas. kbyu7The end result of this truly Modernist approach to art are pieces that are stunning to look at. With your first look, you can clearly see the sculptures and buildings as separate pieces, but the more you look, the more they seem to merge and become one and the same. There is a familiarity there, especially for those who have been to those cities and seen the subjects, yet you also feel as though you are viewing these pieces from an angle that you couldn’t get to in the real world. CaptureJIe is of the belief that architecture experiences the passing of time in much the same way as humans do, so she sees here take on the structures that she uses in her art as a way of re-shaping that history. It’s an incredibly exciting concept that very much shines through in every piece that she creates. Given her past, we can certainly expect her to start incorporating new styles and techniques in the future, which is a truly exciting thought for lovers of her art.    ygvy6

Roderic O’Conor – The Post Impressionist You Probably Haven’t Heard Of

The emergence of post impressionism is probably one of the most colorful and thrilling movements to ever happen in the world of art. Whenever we think about post impressionism, four names usually come to mind: Paul Gauguin, Paul Cézanne, Georges Seurat, and of course, Vincent Van Gogh.image

(Vincent Van Gogh: Wheat Field with Cornflowers)

There’s one name you probably haven’t heard of yet, though. Roderic O’Conor. An Irishman who spent most of his life in France, O’Conor was surprisingly popular amongst artists. In fact, he even got into a brawl with Paul Gauguin and two other artists against a bunch of sailors in Breton fishing port in Concarneau. It was in this brawl that Gauguin got the broken ankle which will eventually plague him up to his death.
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(Roderic O’Conor: Field of Corn)

So, why doesn’t O’Conor’s name ring any bells?

That’s because he wasn’t too focused on putting his work out there. It wasn’t only until fifteen years after his death that his works even circulated in public when his widow auctioned all of them off.
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(Roderic O’Conor: A Tree in a Field)

He was well subsidized by his family, so he really didn’t feel the need to sell his works for a living, unlike other prominent artists at the time. What he did enjoy, though, is to go and view exhibits as much as he can. He liked examining styles and translating them into his own.
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(Cuno Amiet: Blossoming Orchard)

This is the reason why we can almost hear Van Gogh or Cuno Amiet’s work echoing in his own pieces, and why some critics think his work as quite indecisive. Recognize the thick, bold, brush strokes of color? As well as those landscapes that can seemingly pop out into life at any moment?

Despite a lot of us not recognizing his name today, a lot of his contemporaries surprisingly know him well. He was an active member of different art circles, after all.
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(Roderic O’Conor: The Glade)

If you are intrigued and want to see more of O’Conor’s works, then you can view Roderic O’Conor and the Moderns: Between Paris and Pont-Aven in the Beit Wing at the National Gallery of Ireland which will run from July 18 to October 28, 2018. It will be the first retrospective show dedicated to him in thirty years, and promises to show works that have never been viewed publicly before.

References: theartnewspaper.com, irishtimes.com, gauguingallery.com

Digital Grotesque – 3D Printing technology and architectural forms

Digital Grotesque consists of two human-scale, highly ornamented sandstone grottos designed by architects and programmers Benjamin Dillenburger and Michael Hansmeyer. Grottos I and II are 3.2-meters high, designed with customized algorithms and printed with a 3D sand printing technique. These architectural sculptures were made on commission by Centre Pompidou in Paris for its exhibition Imprimer le monde held in March 2017 and FRAC Centre in Orléans.imprimer-le-monde-centre-pompidou-outside1_960 imprimer-le-monde-centre-pompidou-outside6Sand printing technology is shifting boundaries with the use of 3D printing in architecture. It overcomes limitations in  producing architectural components with 3D printing technology that, until now, has only been used to make relatively small objects. Although these sandstones blocks are strong enough to fulfill construction requirements, Benjamin and Michael mixed it with resin in order to further harden it by closing its pores.3d-printed-architecture-installation4 3d-printed-architecture-installation15The computational design allowed architects to render tiniest details into reality and to create a complex and breathtaking surface of artificial sandstone bricks. Aediculaes, which forms the grottos, are rich in details and evoke floral and geometrical forms. Complex geometries are formed with customized algorithms, altering parameters for divisions and subdivisions on the surface which results with 260 million individual facets generated through.3d-printed-architecture-design7 composition1The Digital Grotesque project is not the only one that proves the immense impact that the 3D printing technology has had on architecture. There are other projects which explore opportunities of 3D printing technology, like ProtoHouse 1.0 and ProtoHouse 2.0 by Softkill Design, a UK group of architects or Landscape House by Dutch studio Universe Architecture.