Category - Photography

The Siberian lake Baikal is a real life Frozen

What do any of us really know about Siberia, other than its cold? Not much— and we’re just about to reinforce the idea. Lake Baikal, located in Siberia, is the deepest and cleanest lake on Earth. Clocking in at an astounding 373 miles deep (!!!), the lake can create 6.5 feet of ice on its surface every winter. This means that people, cars and anything weighing less than 16.5 tons can glide across this majestic lake’s surface without even making a crack. Some intrepid visitors even camp on the surface each winter!IMG_2070-copy-58795ece0274f__880 Indeed, the natural wonder has become quite the attraction— not only because of the novelty of it but also because deep underneath the ice, cracks and bubbles form to create some truly remarkable designs on the surface. Once April hits, all action has to halt, as the ice begins to melt, sometimes making sharp, cracking noises like gunshots through the vast expanse of land. [h/t boredpanda.com] IMG_2340-copy-58795f04be876__880 IMG_2379-58795edc8390f__880 IMG_2550-58795f5a53c64__880 IMG_2866-58795ef769164__880

Honesty and Brutality in the works of Kristina Podobed

upload-23ac0430-7f17-11e6-849f-1be2ae58dbc8 The naked human body strikes the audience. Always. After all the years of liberation movements, emancipation and censorship attenuation, it never fails to shock and amuse the viewer… particularly the depiction of a female body, which has been a center of controversy for years. While in the past it was banned, nowadays it remains among the delicate topics in art that somehow still manages to perturbate society.The work of Kristina Podobed thrives off this dynamic.

upload-f985c3c0-7c06-11e6-8d1b-5d1f117716e4 The Ukrainian-based photographer started her journey as a personal struggle with shyness. She took photos of her friends and herself, gradually realizing that there is much more that has to be said. Her images allow imperfections and silliness, she portrays girlhood with the unprejudiced eye of the insider. Being open to the world, to come as you are – this struggle is real, especially in the modern media-influenced society. Kristina Podobed shifted her focus towards more broad, but not less important topics turning her art into a kind of social mirror.

upload-a98ff450-65f7-11e6-b4c1-c1315647fdf2 Youthful and intimate pictures of girls deconstruct the conventional vision of women, obligated to look modest, nice, and polished. Pushing the boundaries of the “acceptable” depiction of women, Podobed is not shy about any aspect of human physicality and nature. Her pictures were banned from social medias numerous times, which just proves the relevance of the issue to the world we live in today. upload-362f1790-7c07-11e6-809c-e5e8e1830c16 This discourse is especially pertinent when taking into account artist’s Eastern Europe origins. In the post-soviet reality women are still under the influence of the past ideology, which tells them to be quite, neat, and to keep it to herself. But nowadays, the youth is changing, shaping the future of the whole country. Kristina Podobed reflects these transformations, presenting the world with the new generation which is trying to be brutally honest and free.

upload-542b06a0-7c07-11e6-809c-e5e8e1830c16 Ms Podobed continues her artistic pursuits, concentrating on the social photography, depicting people and their environment. Coming back to the point of controversy linked to the depiction of female body, we can say that it is closely related to artificial notion in our heads, that had been embedded a long time ago. We are surrounded by the turmoil of distorted images produced by glamor magazines and advertisements; we bear the heritage of the patriarchal social order which has ruled the world for ages. No wonder it is hard to deconstruct such deeply rooted stereotypes, which were supposed to disappear under the equality and feminism, but in reality are still fueled by another value systems. Photographers like Kristina Podobed help reclaiming the  women’s body giving fresh and truthful ideas of self-identity to the upcoming generations. This is how the future is done in the world of art.

Sean Lotman’s analog photographs of Japanese life bring soul to a digital world

We may be living in the digital age, but Sean Lotman has staked his success in the darkroom. The Kyoto-based photographer recently published his first book, Sunlanders, thats full of analog prints that capture real, fleeting life moments in Japan that are only enhanced by the anomalies found in the darkroom photos.sunlanders2 Blurred movements, light spots, overexposure, color warps and other “imperfections” are sprinkled throughout the series, giving the photos a simultaneously realistic and otherworldly feel; a convenience store clerk is infused with a creepy aura from a simple overexposure while a woman posing for an outdoor portrait gets a ghostly halo because of a light spot. Lotman presents his photos without commentary or caption. Its up to you, the viewer, to interpret these densely layered images using your own references. [via: theculturetrip.com] sunlanders3 sunlanders5 sunlanders6 sunlanders7 sunlanders8 sunlanders9 sunlanders10