Navy Man Sucked into Jet Engine — and Survives! Watch Now!

Desert Storm, February 20th, 1991. A trainee on the flight deck has been asked to check a launching mechanism on an A63 Intruder.

Trainee inspects A6E Intruder

Trainee inspects A6E Intruder

Image Credit: youtube

He finishes his check and begins to move away when 21 year old John Bridget approaches.

John Bridget approaches

John Bridget approaches

Image Credit: youtube

But with the engines already at full throttle, he has made a grave mistake. He is sucked into the powerful jet engine but amazingly survives. Daniel P. Streckfuss, who was on board, describes how Bridget escaped death:

What allowed him to survive was the design of the A-6 engine (the J-52). It has a long protruding ‘bullet’ or cone that extends in front of the first stage fans. When he was sucked in, his arm extended above his head which caused his body to wedge between the bullet and inside wall of the intake. Lucky for him, his cranial and float coat were sucked in first causing the FOD’d engine which prompted the pilot to cut the throttle (commanded by the Shooter who moves into the frame kneeling and moving his wand up and down). It took almost 3 minutes for him to push his way out of the intake after being sucked in.

Bridget (left) hours after the event

Bridget (left) hours after the event

Image Credit: youtube

Not all are so lucky. In 2006, 114 passengers and 5 crew members were witness to the gruesome demise via jet engine of an airline mechanic as they waited on the tarmac in a Continental Airlines 737 flight to Houston. Larry Keller, Chairman and CEO, issued the following very brief statement after the tragic incident:

My fellow co-workers and I extend our heartfelt sympathies to the family and friends of the mechanic involved in this tragic event.

What follows is video of John Bridget’s miraculous escape from fate.

Don’t forget to share this incredible video with your friends!

What Would The Simpsons House Look Like if it Were Real? Find Out Here

They’ve been one of our favorite television families for over two decades now. What started as an animated short on the Tracy Ullman show has become one of television’s all-time classics. It has weathered multiple wars, Presidents and everything Bart and Homer could conjure up.

The house we all know and love

The house we all know and love

Image Credits: jaysbrickblog.com

But what would it be like to really live in the Simpsons house? One lucky contest winner was given the chance to find out – if they so chose. A real-life replica of 742 Evergreen Terrace was built at 712 Red Bark Lane in Henderson, Nevada. The winning family was given the choice of $75,000 or the house, provided they repaint to comply with local home owners’ association ordinances.

In the following photos, you’ll see the real-life recreation of the rooms where Bart, Lisa, Homer, Marge and Maggie have given you so much entertainment over the years. Finally, you’ll see what the house looks like today.

742 Evergreen Terrace / 712

712 Red Bark Lane / 742 Evergreen Terrace

Image Credit: spotcoolstuff.com

simpsons-kitchen Image Credit: dailymail.co.uk

Simpsons creator Matt Groening heads up the stairs

Simpsons creator Matt Groening heads up the stairs

Image Credit: simpsoncrazy.com

The couch even looks like it's been worn in by Homer

The couch even looks like it’s been worn in by Homer

Image Credit: villageofjoy.com

Margaret, or "Maggie's" high chair

Margaret, or “Maggie’s” high chair

Image Credit: spotcoolstuff.com

Where 3.2 children were made

Where 3.2 children were made

Image Credit: dailymail.co.uk

The dining room, where Homer embarrasses Marge in front of dinner guests

The Simpson family dining room

Image Credit: truenewsusa.blogspot.com

…and finally, the house as it looks today. It was fun while it lasted.

Some people are just no fun

Some people are just no fun

Image Credit: wikipedia

The Castle From Your Worst Nightmares. Dare to Take a Look Inside?

Miranda Castle, or Chateau Miranda, was commissioned by the Liedekerke-Beaufort family in 1866. The family sought a famed English architect to design the home for them while living in a farmhouse in Celles, Belgium after fleeing the French revolution. It would stay in the hands of the family until World War II, when it fell into the hands of the National Railroad Company of Belgium. At the war’s conclusion, it became known as ‘Chateau de Noisy,’ as it served as a children’s home until 1980.

It has been abandoned since 1991, but has become a favorite among European urban explorers. There they can traverse through the many rooms – that still have floors – see the chalkboard where children once practiced their school lessons, or sit on the front lawn that once was sight to a castle beyond words, but is now eerie beyond belief.

If you’d like to explore the castle for yourself, move quick – it’s slated to be demolished this year.

Exterior shot of Chateau de Noisy

Exterior shot of Chateau de Noisy

Image Credit: talkurbex.com

mansion-02 Image Credit: talkurbex.com

mansion-08 Image Credit: talkurbex.com

mansion-09 Image Credit: talkurbex.com

mansion-10 Image Credit: talkurbex.com

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